Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Please read these Terms of Use and Privacy Statement (collectively, the "Terms") carefully before using any of the box above indicates that you accept these Terms.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
x

Are you interested in possibly participating in a clinical trial for Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia?

Read More

Following specialists treat  Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Help us improve our data based on your experience.

Based on your feedback, we will add the specialty within 1 month


Submit

100%

100%

50%

50%

0%20%40%60%80%

Specialty scores for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Overview

You're working at your desk, trying to ignore the tingling or numbness you've had for some time in your hand and wrist. Suddenly, a sharp, piercing pain shoots through the wrist and up your arm. Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome.

The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and bones at the base of your hand. It contains nerve and tendons. Sometimes, thickening from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms usually start gradually. As they worsen, grasping objects can become difficult.

Often, the cause is having a smaller carpal tunnel than other people do. Other causes include performing assembly line work, wrist injury, or swelling due to certain diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Women are three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men.

Early diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent permanent nerve damage. Your doctor diagnoses carpal tunnel syndrome with a physical exam and special nerve tests. Treatment includes resting your hand, splints, pain and anti-inflammatory medicines, and sometimes surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke