Myasthenia Gravis

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Myasthenia Gravis
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Following specialists treat  Myasthenia Gravis. Help us improve our data based on your experience.

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Blogs

  • Personalized treatment for Myasthenia Gravis based on your antibody profile

    Patients with myasthenia gravis complain of muscle weakness, and so-called fatigability. This means that if a muscle is repeatedly used it rapidly tires out. Although these symptoms may sound familiar to many of us, they are of course much more severe in those with myasthenia gravis (MG). MG is caused by auto-antibodies. Antibodies are molecules produced by the body to specifically target ‘foreign’ proteins – such as those found on infective bacteria. Auto-antibodies are antibodies made by the body to target proteins found within ourselves. We often do not understand what triggers production of auto-antibodies; their effects include diseases involving the thyroid gland, joints, bowel and some cases of diabetes. In MG auto-antibodies target molecules involved in sending or transmitting the signal to contract from nerves to muscles. Many molecules are used by the body to send these messages, one of the most common being Acetylcholine. Myasthenia gravis targets the receptor for acetylcholine. To send a message to a muscle, the nerve releases acetylcholine. This then ‘locks on’ to the muscle via the acetylcholine receptor, passing on the message to contract. In MG, auto-antibodies disrupt this process, reducing the effectiveness of acetylcholine and therefore reducing the strength or durability of muscle contraction.

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  • DO YOU HAVE MYASTHENIA GRAVIS WITHOUT THYMOMA? THYMECTOMY MAY STILL BE HELPFUL?

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by progressive weakness and easy fatigability of the voluntary muscles (i.e. muscles under your control). What triggers MG? It is believed that MG is due to an autoimmune destruction of the receptors located at the junction between the nerve and muscle. Consequently, the communication between the nerve and muscle is breached.

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