Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion

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Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion
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85%

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Specialty scores for Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion

Overview

Source: In partnership with Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, and the National Human Genome Research Institute https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/gard.

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Cushing disease

overview Question

What is Cushing disease?

Cushing disease is a condition caused by elevated levels of a hormone called cortisol. It is part of a group of diseases known as Cushing’s syndrome. The signs and symptoms include weight gain around the trunk and in the face, stretch marks, easy bruising, a hump on the upper back, muscle weakness, tiredness, thin bones that are prone to fracture (osteoporosis), mood disorders and memory problems. Patients also have an increased risk of infections, high blood pressure and diabetes. Women may have irregular menses and a lot of hair in the body (hirsutism). Cushing disease occurs when a benign pituitary tumor (adenoma) or pituitary hyperplasia causes the adrenal glands to produce large amounts of cortisol. The genetic cause of Cushing disease is often unknown but some cases are caused by somatic mutations in genes involved in hormonal activity. Most cases occur sporadically in people with no family history of the condition. Rarely, Cushing disease can be inherited, either as an isolated condition or as part of a genetic syndrome (such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and familial isolated pituitary adenoma). Treatment generally involves surgery to remove the tumor and medications to decrease cortisol levels.

Date Modified: 2015-12-16T17:33:00

Presentation(s)

Abnormality of adipose tissue

Hypercortisolism

Neoplasm of the endocrine system

Round face

Thin skin

Truncal obesity

Acne

Bruising susceptibility

Decreased fertility

Diabetes mellitus

Hypertension

Hypertrichosis

Hypokalemia

Nephrolithiasis

Recurrent fractures

Reduced bone mineral density

Abdominal pain

Abnormality of the gastric mucosa

Aseptic necrosis

Cataract

Generalized hyperpigmentation

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Migraine

Myopathy

Paronychia

Reduced consciousness/confusion

Secondary amenorrhea

Skin ulcer

Sleep disturbance

Telangiectasia of the skin

Thrombophlebitis

Visual impairment

Abdominal obesity

Abnormal fear/anxiety-related behavior

Alkalosis

Biconcave vertebral bodies

Edema

Facial erythema

Glucose intolerance

Hirsutism

Increased circulating ACTH level

Kyphosis

Mood changes

Oligomenorrhea

Osteoporosis

Pituitary adenoma

Poor wound healing

Psychotic mentation

Purpura

Skeletal muscle atrophy

Striae distensae

Vertebral compression fractures